Last Tuesday, in preparation of the photo shoot I was doing the next day, I spent the whole night setting up a home photography studio using a little bit of Google and a lot a bit of diy. I'd purchased a few things, external flashes, stands, an umbrella, backdrops, etc from Amazon but I hadn't yet purchased a backdrop stand. Seeing that my tab on this home studio was adding up and I wanted to try and cut corners where I could, I headed to the dear old internets (yep, 'cause it's plural) for some "how to's". This was the one I ended up settling on. Click the image below to go to the website and read the instructions.
Picture
image via www.bonfirevintage.com
This is a backdrop stand made out of PVC pipes that can be purchased at Lowe's or Home Depot. I'd seen a number of DIY backdrop stands made from PVC pipes but they all seemed to have extra steps and extra materials and cost extra money. The construction and instructions on this particular stand seemed simple enough and money conscious enough for my liking.

For my backdrop, I picked up (3) 10' PVC pipes that were 1 1/4" thick. These were cut into (3) 5' pieces and (6) 2.5' pieces. The price for an entry level backdrop on Amazon is about $40. All of my pieces cost about $26. Booooow!


(3) 5' pieces
(6) 2.5' pieces.


(2) 1 1/4" T pieces
(2) 1 1/4" Elbow pieces

(4) 1 1/4" End caps
(5) 1 1/4" Coupling pieces

Using the instructions from the website and a little 1+1, I began assembling my backdrop stand.






Since I didn't have sandbags, I threw blankets on the legs of the stand in order to provide extra weight and support.

When I initially made the backdrop, it measured in at about 8' tall. The piping was cut a little unevenly at the store which resulted in one side of it scrubbing the ceiling and it didn't seem very sturdy at this height. I decided to take the 2 1/2' pieces off the height and let it remain at 5'. I knew I was mostly doing poses of her sitting on the floor and a stool, kneeling, or lying down so the 5' was more than tall enough. I then added the 2 1/2' piece to the width of the backdrop to make for a wider shot. Which after beginning to edit my shots, I find that I now need a wider backdrop also. Oh, wells. Due time.





Test shot using flash on the camera, two external flashes, and one umbrella.


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